(Dublin, NH) - Camouflage clothing has become a fashion statement as well as clothing work by hunters and members of the military, and it's origin can be traced to a New Hampshire man.

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Abbott Handerson Thayer was an American artist, born in Boston in 1849. He was the son of a country Doctor and grew up in New Hampshire. He studied painting in New York before returning to the Granite State and settling in Dublin.

While Thayer was known mostly for his angel paintings, he was fascinated with the way animals were able to use their colors to conceal themselves from predators.

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He forwarded his "concealing coloration" theory to the French government during World War 1, which they adopted and applied the variegated design to Allied uniforms, the birth of "camo".

The design was adapted and used to disguise vehicles, buildings and even naval ships.

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"Camouflage in WW1 and in Nature" is one of three new displays at The Little Nature Museum in Warner, NH which is marking the 100th anniversary of the U.S entry into the war.