I remember my grandparents always eating dandelion greens in the springtime and I'd never touch them. I tried making them yesterday, so I'm about to walk you through the process and review how they tasted.

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There are dozens of online videos on how to identify dandelion greens so I'd consult some of those before you attempt to eat anything growing in your yard.

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Many foraging experts suggest that the greens growing in shady areas have the best flavor. Also, the darker the shade of green, the better for both flavor and nutritive properties.

They're extremely easy to pick, just snap them off easily with your thumb and index finger by the base of the plant.

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Rinse them repeatedly in a bowl of water. I did this three times to remove all grit and dirt.

I then kept the greens soaking in this bowl with a sprinkling of table salt while I waited for the water on the stove to boil. (The salt is supposed to remove bitterness.)

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Boil for ten minutes and then throw them into a strainer.

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The finished product! I couldn't believe how great these were. Tender and flavorful and just like high quality baby spinach but way more fresh.

By the way, the gigantic pat of butter was an insurance policy because I remember them being bitter and stringy the one time I tried them at age 4.

If you're a fan of dark leafy greens, I guarantee you'll love this.

Pulling pesky weeds can result in a delicious snack? Who knew?!