Imagine having an hour-and-a-half stand-off with a bobcat in your own yard.

And not once, but twice.

Kendra Disilva @kendra.disilva.trexphotography
Kendra Disilva @kendra.disilva.trexphotography
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Kendra Disilva of West Ossipee, New Hampshire, pulled into her driveway and spotted something furry jump over a snowbank in her front yard.

She didn't think much of it until she saw it peek over the snowbank and look at her. It was this bobcat.

Kendra Disilva @kendra.disilva.trexphotography
Kendra Disilva @kendra.disilva.trexphotography
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She didn't move, choosing to stay in her car, and for an hour-and-a-half they just watched each other.

She said:

"I didn't want to just get out of my car.  I didn't want to scare him away.  I wanted him to feel safe so I decided to just hang out.  I even stood out of my sunroof to try and get pictures but had a hard time."

This may not be a usual response for most of us, but it turns out Kendra is an amateur wildlife photographer who shared this experience on the New Hampshire Facebook page.

This hobby started around the same time as the pandemic, but how cool to run into wildlife in her own yard.

She told me:

"The bobcat finally ran behind my house so I went inside to make dinner and shower. But for some reason something told me to look outside a couple of hours later.  Sure enough, there he was, in the woods, staring behind my house."

Kendra changed into camouflage clothing she recently bought for her adventures to wildlife-rich New Hampshire areas. She'll sit for hours sometimes, hoping to snap that perfect photo.

Kendra Disilva @kendra.disilva.trexphotography
Kendra Disilva @kendra.disilva.trexphotography
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She tiptoed carefully outside her house through the crunchy snow in her backyard toward the woods, slipping in and out behind trees, to try and snap that perfect photo. I'd say she did an incredible job.

Let's be honest though, there's no way that bobcat didn't hear her sneaking about.  Did he simply feel safe after their earlier friendly face-off, or is she simply a wildlife whisperer?

Although the New Hampshire bobcat population has grown from 150 to 1400 over the last 30 years, they're still rare to see, according to the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, which says they most definitely see us well before we see them.

Kendra Disilva @kendra.disilva.trexphotography
Kendra Disilva @kendra.disilva.trexphotography
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Hmmmmm, sounds like Kendra may just be a wildlife whisperer. You can see more of Kendra's awesome photography here

What animal would you love to see in person?

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