Residents of Langdon have held their annual town meeting in the same place since the start of the 1800s.

The Granite State is steeped in tradition. From our slogan of 'Live Free or Die,' to the first primary in the nation, right down to how we hold town meetings.

The community of Langdon has been holding their town meetings in the same location since 1803.

The town, which had a population of 688 in 2010, according to Wikipedia, first settled in 1773, and was incorporated on January 11, 1787.

Now, their meeting house has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

According to Boston.com, the building has quite the history. The Georgian-style Meeting House was a two-story space that served both town and church functions.

However, to comply with the state's Toleration Act of 1819, which called for physical and financial separation of religious and government public spaces, the town sold 10 feet at the west end of the building, Boston.com stated. Later, the second-story gallery space in 1851.

To this day, the town still holds their town meeting on the first floor.

Langdon is named for New Hampshire's John Langdon, who was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.