This really isn't a fun topic at all, however, with the recent shark attacks as far North as Harpswell, Maine from last year, it's probably a good idea to keep these tips in mind should you encounter a shark while swimming in our Northeast waters.

I feel like we should pause for a moment before we get in to the Shark attack tips to acknowledge the life of 63 year old Julie Dimperio Holowach who was killed by a great white on July 28, 2020.  She was swimming with her daughter, according to the story reported by the Bangor Daily News.  Julie certainly didn't provoke the shark and was just out on a swim with her daughter.  It's terrifying.

Sharks here in the waters of the Northeast are more common than you would think.  According to the Bangor Daily News, shark sightings date back to the 1800's.

Mentalfloss.com did an article with a list of suggestions that I've used here as well.  I skipped the first one which is, "don't panic around a shark."  Umm..... Yeah, well.... If I see a shark coming at me, even if it's one of those humungo ones that aren't harmful and only eat plankton, I'm gonna panic.  I don't think I could help it!  So, yeah, I threw that tip out the window.  The others, however, seem helpful.

I would hope that if I were ever attacked, my martial arts training would come back to me.  Like the list here, martial arts training says to go for the most vulnerable places you can go on your attacker, including the eyes.  I know it sounds gross, but if I was being attacked, I wouldn't have any problem with that.

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