Cape Cod attracts a lot of great white sharks, especially Chatham harbor which is where we were on part of our vacation recently.

There are many seals in Chatham harbor and sharks hunt seals.  There are signs everywhere on the beach in Chatham warning you not to swim, like this one that says:

WARNING:  Great white sharks hunt seals in shallow water on this beach.  People have been seriously injured and killed by white sharks along this coastline.  Know your risk when entering the water.

 

Sully pix

The sign also shows peak activity for shark sightings. Turns out it’s not June, July or even August.  It's September and October!  After October the numbers of shark sightings drop off significantly, however, sharks may remain year-round.

If you live near the ocean, chances are, you love everything about it, including sharks.  Although it is a bummer that you need to think of such things when you are enjoying a day at the beach, but it could save your life.

Remember about a year ago in Harpswell when a woman went in the ocean for a swim and ended up losing her life.  According to a report from WGME, there have been changes made since that tragedy happened.  Purple flags have been installed to warn people if a shark is seen in the waters.  The Fire Administrator for Harpswell told WGME:

 

We’re just looking to engage the public and make them aware these animals are alive and well in their own environment and it happens to be and can be close to our swimming areas, our publicly accessible areas.

Where seals are, sharks won't be far away.

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